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Here are some Web pages that mention me and my books.

Mentions Not About a Specific Book
I am mentioned as the source for information about one of the "jobs you won't believe people get paid for" on the Kiplinger website.

An Italian journalist interviewed me about how to identify the best jobs. If you can read Italian, you may enjoy the article.

I am mentioned as a source for an article on the Cosmopolitan website, "14 Best Jobs for Women."


The Yahoo! Education site quoted me in an article about associate degrees: "Why It's Smart: 'Having an associate degree [in paralegal studies] is a sweet spot in terms of employment,' Shatkin says. Why? Could be due to the fact that - according to the U.S. Department of Labor - one with a degree in paralegal studies could potentially find work helping lawyers prepare for a hearing or trial as a paralegal, a career that is projected to grow by 18 percent from 2010 to 2020."

Jenna Goudreau interviewed me for an article, on the Forbes website, about the best jobs for women in 2012. I based my picks on the job-satisfaction responses of women to the 2003 National Survey of College Graduates. Regarding my #1 pick, postsecondary teachers: "Shatkin believes women likely value post-secondary teaching for its high earnings, prestige and stimulating environments. The National Survey of College Graduates found that women appreciate a job’s location and environment more than men, and Shatkin points out that college students are generally excited to learn, colleagues are of high caliber and college campuses provide comfortable amenities. At the same time, post-secondary teachers have a high degree of independence and autonomy, which Shatkin says almost all workers prize."

The Star-Ledger (Newark) quoted my suggestion for a career-related New Year's resolution: "Every industry has at least one [blog]. Reading it on a regular basis keeps you informed about the news and issues that are important for your industry. Postings may alert you to business opportunities, new technologies and practices, changes in the competitive or regulatory environment, or even job openings. Commenting frequently on the blog will help build your reputation and expand your network."

The Career Builder page on MSN.com mentioned me in an article about freelancing: "But there is also a flipside -- keeping your work life from overwhelming your non-work life. As career information author Laurence Shatkin cautions, 'Because your income depends on the amount of work you get, you face a constant temptation to put in just a few more hours, to check your email a few more times during the evening and to take on one more project because you don't know whether you'll have any luck next month.'"

Another article on that site, by Debra Auerbach, cited me. The article was about job titles that have been changed to remove gender. "Old: policeman; New: police officer or law enforcement officer (although Senior Product Developer Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., at career publisher JIST Publishing points out that this revised title is slightly inaccurate, because not all police men or women are officers.)"

Kristina Cowan quoted me in an article on the Monster Excelle site about the highest-paying jobs for women: “'Technology is still dominated by men, but it’s becoming more friendly to women,' says Shatkin, a career information expert. 'More and more of it is high-tech, where it doesn’t have the work conditions that are strenuous, difficult, mechanical. That’s proved very attractive to women.'”

The Yahoo! Education site mentioned me in an article about upgrading skills: "Career expert Dr. Laurence Shatkin says the health and technology fields are expanding and will continue to hire into the years ahead. 'Certificates and degrees in the fields of health care and high technology are in high demand now and will remain in demand in the near future,' Shatkin says."

In a Yahoo! HotJobs article about emerging occupations, Larry Buhl mentions me: "Some of these jobs -- at least the duties -- have been around in some form for a while. What's new is a 'professional pathway' for these careers, according to employment expert and author Laurence Shatkin. 'O*Net officially recognizes job titles once there is a critical mass of workers in those jobs and a clear road map for attaining the positions,' he says.

The AOL Jobs site ran an original article by me, "Researching Career Options": "Before you commit to a career, you need to have a clear picture of what you're getting into. You need to get accurate information and evaluate it critically."

In this interview by Bill Vick (a video), I had the chance to talk about a lot of issues that Baby Boomers and others face when making career decisions and career moves. Because it was shot via YouTube, it shows my home office. If you look carefully toward the end, you'll see my cat creep into the office and jump up on the desk.

An article by a Monster contributing writer, Larry Buhl, which was later reprinted on the websites of the Ashland, KY, Daily Independent and the Sioux City Journal, quotes me: "It's easier to make a career transition within your field, says career information expert and author Laurence Shatkin. 'In almost any industry where you have insider's knowledge you can make a change within that area and maybe earn more,' he says."

The Career Rover blog quotes me in an article about best-paying jobs for women.

The Washington Post cites me: "The fastest-growing occupations with a lot of openings have a familiar ring, says occupational expert Laurence Shatkin. Over 10 years (beginning in 2008), the number of computer network systems and database administrator openings could grow, on average, by 46,000 a year. Registered nurses could see 104,000 job openings per year. There will be a huge need for accountants and auditors, with about 50,000 openings per year."

Also see this Yahoo! Hot Jobs story about how to "Reroute Your Career": "In almost any industry where you have an insider's knowledge, you can make a change within that field and maybe earn more."

I was a featured speaker at the 2010 Careers Conference, with a presentation about "Best Jobs for Renewing America." You may see the video of the complete session (including overheads).






 


150 Best Jobs for the Military-to-Civilian Transition


The TAOnline site listed the top 10 jobs from this book:
"'One reason this list can be useful is that you probably have much in common with these other veterans,' Shatkin writes. 'Whatever the reasons that recent veterans are concentrated in these jobs, these same reasons may work in your favor, improving your odds of getting hired.'"






300 Best Jobs Without a Four-Year Degree


I was interviewed on the Fox Business Network's Willis Report: "
You can get into a career as a registered nurse with a two-year degree. Now, your opportunities will be more limited and you probably won't be [earning] up in the sixties there.But once you get that job you can start getting experience and even get educational benefits that will get you into one of the two-to-four year programs that get gets the bachelor's degree paid for. That's a pretty sweet deal."

The Fox News site referred to the book while using several quotations from an interview with me: 

"News of computer support jobs getting outsourced to distant foreign lands makes the headlines, but according to Shatkin, the field is still growing at home, too. 'There are a lot of things that have to be done on site,' he says. 'If you have to change a disk drive for instance, someone has to be there to do that. There's still a need for (support personnel) in the office'."


The Career Planning blog quoted from this book: “'A four-year degree is more expensive now than ever before, so these careers avoid the full expense and allow you to start earning sooner,' said Shatkin. He further advised that those who opt for a two-year degree program find one that a four-year college will recognize and transfer those credits, providing the option to more easily move into a four-year program down the line."


Seventeen (yes, the magazine for tween girls) featured a list of occupations from the book: "Your parents, teachers, and guidance counselors may all be pushing college because it’s true thatthe average college graduate will earn almost $1 million more than a high school graduate over the course of her lifetime. However, that’s not to say that there aren’t great, high-paying jobs for those without a college degree. In fact, some our country’s fastest growing jobs are relying more on service, technical skills, or vocational training — not necessarily a college degree."


50 Best Jobs for Your Personality

Yahoo! Education mentioned the book in an article about careers for introverts: "'People who are quiet might focus on data and things, rather than people, so there are some occupations [in which] they might be able to do a better job,' says Laurence Shatkin, a career expert and author of several books, including "50 Best Jobs for Your Personality.'"

On the Forbes site, Jenna Goudreau wrote about the best-paying Social occupations: To determine the 20 best-paying jobs for people with social skills, Shatkin pulled out all jobs in the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Information Network (O*NET) that were labeled as requiring skills of persuasion, negotiation, social perceptiveness, instructing others, coordinating efforts and service orientation. He then ranked them by median annual earnings for full-time workers in 2010, based on occupational and wage data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The result? From management to law and health care, these are the jobs where people persons earn the most.

The Women in Business and Industry site included a list from the book: "Those with enterprising personalities 'like work activities having to do with starting up and carrying out projects, especially business ventures,' Shatkin says. 'They like persuading and leading people and making decisions. They like taking risks for profit. These personalities prefer action rather than thought.'”

The CollegeRecruiter site cited the book:
"Research has proven that people who connect their personality types to their careers tend to have the most satisfaction and success. In his new book, 50 Best Jobs for Your Personality, Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., compiles the best jobs for five different personalities: realistic, investigative, artistic, social and enterprising."


Listen to an interview with me on the Careers Info Security site (or read the transcript), in which I discuss various specializations within information security that are appropriate for different personality types.


The Yahoo! Education site ran an article about the book: "Character traits can go a long way in determining how successful and satisfied you'll be on the job. Just ask career experts Michael Farr and Laurence Shatkin."


The business news site Spinport News featured the book: "Character traits go a long way in determining the success and satisfaction you experience doing a certain job. In their book, Best Jobs for your Personality, Laurence Shatkin and Michael Farr said that your personality type predetermines your satisfaction, productivity, and likelihood of continuing with a particular kind of work."

College Majors Handbook

A list from the book was featured in an article on the CBS News Moneywatch site: "Clearly, it's important to earn a college degree, because the earnings gap between high school and college grads is significant. In 2011, for instance, high school graduates in their 20s were making a mean annual salary of $25,484, versus $39,705 for college graduates of the same age."


FastWeb.com also cited this list.


CareerKids.com and CareersForever.com mentioned the book in the context of considerations for selecting a major: "Prospective students may also want to research what types of jobs each major may lead to, if it requires education beyond a Bachelor’s degree, what type of salaries and tasks are to be expected, and the courses it may require. This information is incredibly useful when determining what type of major you want to purse. For more information, check out The College Majors Handbook: The Actual Jobs, Earnings, and Trends for Graduates at the Career Kids and CareersForever stores."



150 Best Jobs for Your Skills

On the Forbes site, Jenna Goudreau wrote about the best-paying Social occupations: "To determine the 20 best-paying jobs for people with social skills, Shatkin pulled out all jobs in the U.S. Department of Labor’s Occupational Information Network (O*NET) that were labeled as requiring skills of persuasion,negotiation, social perceptiveness, instructing others, coordinating efforts and service orientation. He then ranked them by median annual earnings for full-time workers in 2010, based on occupational and wage data from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The result? From management to law and health care, these are the jobs where people persons earn the most."

The Forbes story was also referred to on Singapore's AsiaOne site, on the site of Long Island Business News, and on the Alternet site.

The Elite Medical Scribes site mentioned the book: "Young people in today's economy have a variety of obstacles to consider when choosing a career, especially since the unemployment rate for the 16-to-24 age group was more than 18 percent in 2011. With his list, Shatkin set out to uncover the best jobs available for young people, taking opportunities for entry level and upward mobility into consideration."

The CareerBuilder site featured this book. Some lists from the book are included in an article by Associated Press. It also got a favorable reference by a blogger on CollegeRecruiter.com. "Focus on what aspects of your work you truly enjoy every day, and then ask yourself why. Do the same exercise with any volunteer work that you do, and hobbies. Concentrate on those things in life that you do well and truly enjoy doing, then try to transfer those skill sets to jobs that might be out there."



Best Jobs for the 21st Century


I was mentioned in a story on the NBC News website: "'The major trends are automation and offshoring. This has led to the "hollowing-out" of the workforce, meaning that middle-skill jobs are in decline, because they can be done either by computers or by cheaper offshore workers... (But) low-skill jobs, especially service jobs, and high-skill jobs are expanding,' says Laurence Shatkin, a workplace researcher and author of numerous career books, including 'Best Jobs for the 21st Century.'”


The Student Branding blog cited the book: "Each year, the U.S. News and World Report compiles a list of “best jobs” based on labor statistics and other data that indicate the types of careers likely to see consistent hiring over the next few years. Additionally, jobs expert Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., author of Best Jobs for the 21st Century, compiled a list of hot jobs for women. Listed below are some examples of hot careers in today’s market."


The Software Advice site featured a fact from the book: "Civil engineering: On sites where natural gas is being extracted, civil engineers are needed to plan roads, highways and other infrastructure projects. Laurence Shatkin, author of 21st Century Jobs, believes that demand for civil engineers will spike 24.3 percent over the next few years. Of course, getting a job as a civil engineer requires an extensive educational background."


A Swedish website quoted from the book: "More employers today are offering training to fill open positions, so job seekers can look for retraining opportunities to help them get jobs in growing fields. Many of those fast-growing jobs can be found in the book 'Best Jobs for the 21st Century,' by Laurence Shatkin."


The Yahoo! Education site cited me in an article about careers that require only an associate degree: "'[Paralegal] is expanding because of the need to hand off tasks from highly paid lawyers to less expensive staff. Pay is high because paralegals need to have a broad knowledge in legal terminology and procedures,' says Laurence Shatkin, a career expert with more than 30 years of experience and author of 'Best Jobs for the 21st Century'."


The Mother Nature Network featured information from the book: "The book looks at 400 jobs ranked by the best combination of pay, growth and openings."

CareerBuilder ran a feature on the MSN site with information from the book: "More and more employers in today's workforce are reskilling to fill open positions, so job seekers can look for retraining opportunities to help them get jobs in growing fields. Many of those fast-growing jobs can be found in the book, "Best Jobs for the 21st Century," by Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D."

The Fortune website listed my picks for 10 hot careers to watch in 2012: "Openings for software developers who specialize in applications will rise by more than one-third (34%) by 2018, says Best Jobs for the 21st Century, a new book by job market analyst Laurence Shatkin, while companies will hire 20% more computer systems analysts. Rising pay in these fields reflects the surge in demand: The Bureau of Labor Statistics says that developers of systems software, for instance, earn an average of $94,180 per year."

The Forbes Woman site featured 10 careers that have received high job-satisfaction ratings from women: "Jobs expert Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., author of Best Jobs for the 21stCentury, provides a rare look at the jobs that women feel most satisfied and successful in." The Shine from Yahoo site ran the same story.

Yahoo! Education referred to the book in an article about the most valuable college degrees: "The timing for earning an associate's degree in medical assisting couldn't be better. The suddenly red-hot career was highlighted in Laurence Shatkin's book Best Jobs for the 21st Century and was also named by Forbes as one of the fastest growing jobs for women in 2010." The article was reproduced on the eduJunction site, the Evergreen Campus College and Career Blog, and the site of the Oregon Society of Certified Public Accountants.

An article on the U.S. News and World Report site (also posted to Yahoo! News) included my comments about how to be the irreplaceable worker: "Become known in your office as the person people go to for help or for information about specific problems. 'You want to make sure people know what you're doing,' says Shatkin. Keep your boss and coworkers updated with occasional progress reports through E-mail or on an internal company blog. That way, when company downsizing comes up, your contributions, energy, and enthusiasm are clearly documented. You want your colleagues to think: 'We can't get rid of that person. This is the guy who does this,' Shatkin says."

The Forbes Woman site quoted me in an article about the most popular college majors for women: "'Business ranks high in terms of employability,' says researcher Laurence Shatkin, author of Best Jobs for the 21st Century. 'It has consistently been a good investment for students'."


150 Best Jobs for a Secure Future


CareerBuilder mentioned the secure jobs that are fast-growing and that are in the public sector.

The Get a Job Advice blog cited the book: "Career choices are affected by a number of demographic factors including gender, geography and age. Laurence Shatkin, the author of the book “150 Best Jobs for a Secure Future,” classified a number of secure jobs according to different demographic factors. One type of jobs he talks about is the one which is best suited to the adult age group- the population above the age of 55 years."

Jobs.Roanoke.com highlighted what the book said about health-care occupations: “'The fact that the population is getting older and needing care is adding to the security of the health care industry,' says Shatkin, who considered the effects of long-term trends like automation, demographics, global competition and offshoring as well as economic criteria including annual earnings, projected growth and the number of job openings."

HourlyJob.com looked at which industries are growing fastest: "Most employees just want to ensure their jobs are secure. Laurence Shatkin, in his new book 150 Best Jobs for a Secure Future, details the most secure occupations and fields: computer systems design, educational services, government, health care, repair and maintenance, and utilities."

The Columbus, Indiana, Republic ran an article about the book: "As the economy continues to heal from the Great Recession, job security is more important than ever to most workers. Employees can preserve job security by making sure they are irreplaceable to their companies, says Laurence Shatkin in his new book, 150 Best Jobs for a Secure Future.'Sometimes jobs are threatened because a particular business gets into trouble even though the economy may be in good shape,' says Shatkin. '(But) even a prosperous business may need to lay off workers.'"

CareerBuilder featured an article about the book on the MSN site: "In '150 Best Jobs for a Secure Future,' Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., takes Holland's personality data and marries it with data he compiled from sources, including the Bureau of Labor Statistics, to determine which jobs are best suited for each personality type."

The Career Services blog at Marylhurst University wrote a favorable review of the book: "
So how do you recession proof your career?  Pick a career that isn’t likely to go away!   The book 150 Best Jobs for a Secure Future from Jist Works Publishing, compiles statistics on the type of jobs you should look into if you want to make sure you will actually have a job ten years from now."

The AOL Jobs site featured a slide show about the six career fields covered by the book: "'
"During economic downturns, these fields tend not to shed workers as much as other fields do, and the overall outlook for employment in these fields is good to excellent,' Shatkin said."

The Hispanic Today site ran some suggestions from the book about how to become an irreplaceable worker: "As the nation, economy and businesses continue to heal from the recession, job security is more important than ever to most workers. Employees can preserve job security by ensuring they are irreplaceable to their companies, says Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., in his new book, 150 Best Jobs for a Secure Future."

The Women in Business and Industry site cited information from the book: "During rough economic times, workers experience multiple levels of stress related to layoffs, furloughs, pay cuts and myriad other issues. Most employees just want to ensure their jobs are secure. Laurence Shatkin, in his new book 150 Best Jobs for a Secure Future, details the most secure occupations and fields: computer systems design, educational services, government, health care, repair and maintenance, and utilities." The same article also appeared on the Veterans Enterprise site and the College Recruiter site.


150 Best Federal Jobs

An article on the IT Business Edge site featured numerous quotes from me on the subject of federal employment: "As for the downsides to working for the federal government, Shatkin cited bureaucracy and pay: 'I’ve known some federal workers, and I find that what tends to get to them after a while is the amount of bureaucracy that’s involved. Although there are a lot of good regulations, for example anti-discrimination regulations, they discover that there are people who are manipulating the system in various ways, and that can be a source of dissatisfaction. Another thing is that for the level of education you bring to the job, the pay tends to be less than it is in the private sector. Of course there is more security, and the benefits tend to be better.'"

The Hispanic Live website profiled the book: "Occupational expert and author Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., is widely known for pinpointing which occupations and industries are most likely to offer employment opportunities, job security and great rewards. In his newest book, 150 Best Federal Jobs, he demystifies the world of federal employment, explaining its advantages and identifying its most promising jobs." The same press release is featured on The Black Perspective website.

The Michigan Live website cited some tips from the book: "These ideas [about the advantages of federal jobs] are thanks to author Laurence Shatkin, whose new book 150 Best Federal Jobs, points out the most promising positions. Just reading them makes me want to go to http://www.usajobs.opm.gov and start applying. There are 502 open positions in Michigan."

The Federal Times referred to the book in an article about changing attitudes of federal workers: 

"Laurence Shatkin, an occupational expert and author of 150 Best Federal Jobs, said that younger people are having a harder time finding jobs since the recession and will have higher satisfaction after landing a job. 'A lot of them are having to make compromises about job satisfaction in order to get the satisfaction of getting paid,' Shatkin said. Federal jobs also come with a higher level of security and more flexible benefits, he said. But the bureaucracy and regulation in the federal government might become a greater irritant over time and reduce job satisfaction."



Panicked Student's Guide to Choosing a College Major

The Washington Post website referred briefly to the book: "Laurence Shatkin's book 'Panicked Student's Guide to Choosing a College Major' suggests a more far-sighted process. Be careful, he says, not to pick a major that is going to lead you to a career that is too competitive for your taste, or doesn't suit your personality type, or doesn't match your skills. He says a good guide to a major is to think of the courses you did best in in high school."

The Say Campus Life website reviewed the book: "Shatkin advises nervous students to first 'calm down' and later leads them through brief synopses of more than 120 college majors. That figure is well above the typical number students will find at their respective colleges, but enables students to determine if the path they want is available at their school or elsewhere through transferring."

The New York Post profiled the book:"Worksheets and exercises included in the book, including a personality type checklist and skills checklist, help you assemble a hot list of majors and careers, allowing you to identify those fields of study that are a good fit for your personal needs and preferences. For early starters, recommended high school courses are also included with each listing. "

The School Library Journal, which rarely reviews nonfiction, featured a favorable review of the book: "I really liked how this book helped me discover the careers and majors that I'd be good at and enjoy. There was also some very helpful research—especially the part about predicted job openings and salaries. Shatkin takes into account all of the different reasons to choose a major and a career and helps readers understand themselves at the same time."

It was also reviewed at the Campus Circle website: "This bible for choosing the right major will help guide you figure out what you might like to do with the rest of your school life as well as what field of work you could step into."



Top 300 Careers Without a Four-Year Degree

On the Forbes site, Jenna Goudreau quoted me regarding this book: "'By choosing a career that you can learn through on-the-job training, you can earn while you learn,' says Shatkin. 'Apprenticeships are especially valuable because at the end of your training period you have a credential that you can take anywhere, just like a college degree'.” This story also got picked up by various other sites, such as Yahoo! Finance.

Fox Business News ran a similar story.

Alexandra Levit’s Water Cooler Wisdom Blog featured the book: 
"I have been reading Laurence Shatkin since I was in college. In the process of releasing the tenth edition of Top 100 Careers without a Four-Year Degree, he shared some insights regarding how current labor trends might affect people’s careers – now and in the future."

The CNN Money site used information from the book. "With or without a four-year degree, 'rapid changes in technology now require people to continue learning throughout their work life,' says career expert  Laurence Shatkin. 'Jobs are constantly upgraded, and many of today's jobs can't be done by people who have only the knowledge and skills that were adequate a few years ago'."


The Sequel

AARP used my suggestions for careers that people over 40 might consider worth going back to school for: "Regardless of whether you’re only able to commit to a certificate program or you’re willing to go all the way to a master’s degree, Shatkin has a suggestion that may be right for you."

Larry Buhl mentioned me in a Monster article about careers with a bright outlook: "This career [Ophthalmic Medical Technologist], like many new healthcare jobs, results from siphoning off tasks from higher-paid professionals, says Laurence Shatkin, career information expert and author of The Sequel: How to Change Your Career Without Starting Over. 'The trend of offloading tasks onto lower-paid workers and then professionalizing those jobs into careers is likely to continue as a cost-saving measure in healthcare,' he tells Monster.com."

The Sioux City Journal featured an article by Larry Buhl about the theme of this book: "If your career prospects have stalled or you've lost your passion for your work, you might not need to make a radical change to new industry. You may be able to take an alternative route in your current career -- by using your industry expertise in a new way, advises career expert and author Laurence Shatkin. 'In almost any industry where you have an insider's knowledge, you can make a change within that field and maybe earn more,' he says."

MSN Careers featured a Selena Dehne press release: "According to Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., one strategy that can open many doors is to reroute your career using what you already know. 'You can make your next career the sequel to your previous career. Do something different that uses the knowledge and skills you already have,' he explains."

The concept of the book (if not the book itself) gets referred to in an article on Yahoo! Education: "The good news is that not all career revamps require starting over. In fact, you could potentially move into a 'sequel' career - one that builds on your skills, but also gets you excited about going to work again. 'You can make your next career the sequel to your previous career,' says career information expert Laurence Shatkin."

The Lancaster (Ohio) Eagle-Gazette quoted the book in a feature about career changers: "Before you jump into a new career, find a role model who is doing what you think you want to do, said Laurence Shatkin, author of 'The Sequel: How to Change Careers Without Starting Over.' Ask the person what he went through and how he adapted."

The Boston site Examiner.com ran a feature about the book: "If you are looking to jumpstart, relaunch or change your career, there is an excellent self-starter book written by Laurence Shatkin, PhD, called '2011 Career Plan, The Best Moves Now for a Solid Future.'  It's a very accessible and motivational book whose tone Mr. Shatkin says he 'deliberately modeled after Suze Orman's.' In a step by step format, Mr. Shatkin exhorts his readers to take action or 'take aim' with a simple self-assessment to develop your own career-personality. He then gives detailed career information on large career fields and specific occupations.  Finally he presents a 'gap analysis' of the gap between you and your goal with excellent and concrete advice and resources on how to fill that gap.  This book enables you to take personal and immediate charge of your career in a positive and realistic approach."

The Denver Examiner site profiled the book: "In his new book The Sequel: How to Change Careers Without Starting Over, Dr. Laurence Shatkin explains how a 'sequel career' can help you redefine your career while leveraging the skills, knowledge and education you already possess. Shatkin defines a sequel career as a 'Career that is a different use for the knowledge and skills you’ve acquired in your old job. Like a movie sequel, it carries over much that is familiar from your first effort'.”

The NWJobs site (of the Seattle Times Company) cited what the book has to say about taking a new career for a test drive: "But no matter how experienced a worker may be, a career change is not something that can happen overnight. Shatkin recommends that job seekers looking for a change take their new careers on a 'test drive' to see if it's something that they truly enjoy. If correctly navigated, this experimentation phase can also be done, he writes, without the need to make a radical break with the job seeker's current employer."

An article on the Monster site quotes me regarding mid-life career change. One question was what would be a good move for someone with only a high school diploma: "Laurence Shatkin, a career information expert and the author of 2011 Career Plan, says, 'Instead of an associate's degree program, enroll in an apprenticeship program to prepare for a skilled trade, such as CNC programming, HVAC repair or elevator repair. You'll be earning as you learn, and you'll receive a credential that is nationally recognized'."

Sioux City Journal featured an article originally on the Monster site: "Often it's easier to make a lateral career change within your organization, according to Shatkin. 'The people at your workplace know you and presumably like you,' he says. 'If they need someone in the position you want, they may even train you on their dime'.”



Overnight Career Choice

Nancy Chrisite's Make a Change blog featured a Q&A about the book: "Dr. Shatkin: The fastest way to assess your skills is to divide a page into three columns and, in the leftmost column, list the jobs or work-related projects you’ve done. In the middle column, identify the tasks that were most important for success in these efforts. In the rightmost column, extract the skills that were needed for those tasks."

The Denver Examiner website profiled the book: "Shatkin also emphasizes a key concept throughout his book: that career management is never really complete. 'Whatever makes sense for you today may change over time. Understand that it is not important to know precisely what you want to do forever. Instead, think about what is important to you now and ask yourself, "What do I want to do next?" as a way of setting your course for the future'.”


50 Best College Majors for a Secure Future


The Jobs & Hire site quoted me: "What the experts say: 'People who have studied economics know how to use theoretical models and factual knowledge to solve problems, and in many jobs and occupations that technique produces better decisions than going with one's gut or being the loudest voice in the room,' says Laurence Shatkin, author of '50 Best College Majors for a Secure Future' and '10 Best College Majors for Your Personality.' 'Economics teaches reasoned ways to make business decisions. Almost every workplace needs that'."

An interview with me is posted on the My College Calendar site. (The book that's cited here is 150 Best Recession-Proof Jobs, but the topic is college majors, so 50 Best College Majors for a Secure Future is more relevant.) "Shatkin’s advice to freshmen? Get a well-rounded education. 'We need people in liberal arts who understand science and math, and engineers and scientists who can write,' he says. By pursuing different subjects, students discover skills or talents they never knew they had. 'You become more versatile and learn about yourself. Don’t limit it to schoolwork. Pursue out-of-class activities on campus as well'.”


10 Best College Majors for Your Personality

The New York Post recommended the book: "Included are more than 90 'best majors' lists that connect six personality types to specific college majors."

The book was also reviewed on the Say Campus Life website: "Shatkin offers job details with his data culled from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistic database. For example, for his '10 best conventional majors,' Shatkin lists pharmacy as the top field of choice, paying $109,000 annually in average earnings. Projected job growth from 2008 to 2018 is 17 percent and the number of openings annual is estimated to be 10,580 positions. Importantly, he identifies two or three personality types suitable for this position as there is some overlap. Few jobs are for only one personality type, with most attracting a rich mix of people."

The Her Campus website featured the book: "A self-assessment helps readers determine whether they are Realistic, Investigative, Artistic, Social, Enterprising or Conventional and from there, students can read about more than fifty extensively-researched majors. Want to know about which 'Realistic' majors will land you the highest paying jobs? Page 38. Are you 'Conventional,' and interested in being self-employed? Page 47. Do you consider yourself a person with 'self-control' (interpret as you will)? Page 82 is for you."


2011 Career Plan


The New York Times quoted me in an article about strategies for those out of work for a long time: "It’s also important to keep up with what’s happening in your industry, so that when you do meet with others it’s clear that your knowledge is current, says Laurence Shatkin, a career expert and author of 2011 Career Plan. Maintain your memberships in relevant industry associations and consider volunteering on association committees. If possible, become involved in a communications role in a professional association. 'It could be working on the newsletter or any task where people in the industry see your name,' Mr. Shatkin says. 'The fact that you’re active in the association shows you are still active in your industry.'"

An article on the Fox Business News site quoted me: "These days, the economy's only constant is change -- and change starts with you. If you're forced to reinvent yourself, make sure you have at least the basic skills the market wants, says Laurence Shatkin, author of '2011 Career Plan.'"

AOL Jobs and Career Builder featured a Selena Dehne article about the book: "According to Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., one strategy that can open many doors is to reroute your career using what you already know. 'You can make your next career the sequel to your previous career. Do something different that uses the knowledge and skills you already have,' he explains."

The NewsOxy site quoted me on what jobs and fields are hiring in 2011: "'Jobs are not expected to be plentiful in 2011 — or for several years afterward,' Occupational expert Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., says. 'In fact, we may see a repeat of what happened after the recession of 2001, when 39 months passed before employment rose back to pre-recession levels. This recovery is also a patchwork affair, with some industries bouncing back much faster than others'.” 

An article on the Forbes site (later reproduced on the Today Show site, the Yahoo! Finance site, the U.K.'s Daily Mail site, and the Korea Business Central site) about differences between the outlook for men and women refers to the book: "Employment researcher Laurence Shatkin, author of 2011 Career Plan, says that discrimination or feelings of not fitting in could cause higher turnover rates among men in these jobs, which wouldn't allow them to gain seniority and would negatively affect wages."

The MSN site featured a Selena Dehne article for CareerBuilder about being the worker nobody can afford to lose: "'The best way to hang on to your job is to be irreplaceable. You need to be so vital to the business that it can't go on without you,' Shatkin says."

The Denver Examiner website quoted from the book: “Nowadays, very few employers feel any kind of loyalty toward their employees. When your work is no longer the best way to contribute to the company’s bottom line, you’re history. If your job can be done by a robot, a slick computer app, a worker on some foreign shore, a part-timer, a temporary worker or a fresh-faced graduate—look out!”

CBS News' BNET site cites the book: "The days of the low-paid civil servant are over–nearly half the new hires made during the Obama administration have started at salaries over $100,000, notes Laurence Shatkin, the author of 2011 Career Plan."

The business section of Alabama's Birmingham News cited the book: "'The [career-change] goal doesn't necessarily have to be something you can accomplish fully in 2011,' Shatkin writes. 'A very ambitious goal may take years to reach. But 2011, with its promise of growing opportunities, is when you should at least make some real progress toward your career goal'."

The Yahoo! education page quoted from the book: "'We live in a litigious society,' Shatkin says. 'People are always filing lawsuits; contracts have to be reviewed; and laws have to be complied with. More is getting done by paralegals as people try to offload some of the expense of lawyers.'"

Job Journal featured the book in an article about being an irreplaceable worker: "'Nowadays, very few employers feel any kind of loyalty toward their workers,' explains Shatkin. 'When your work is no longer the best way to contribute to the company’s bottom line, you’re history. If your job can be done by a robot, a slick computer app, a worker on some foreign shore, a part-timer, a temporary worker or a fresh-faced graduate with the latest book-learning and low wage expectations – look out!'"

Bankrate.com quoted from the book: "Try midcareer education and retraining. These days, the economy's only constant is change -- and change starts with you. If you're forced to reinvent yourself, make sure you have at least the basic skills the market wants, says Laurence Shatkin, author of 2011 Career Plan.'If you don't know how to do an Excel spreadsheet, this is the time to learn,' he says."

The CareerBuilder site posted a press release by Selena Dehne about the book: "'Jobs are not expected to be plentiful in 2011 -- or for several years afterward. In fact, we may see a repeat of what happened after the recession of 2001, when 39 months passed before employment rose back to pre-recession levels. This recovery is also a patchwork affair, with some industries bouncing back much faster than others. For example, in March 2010, while manufacturers were adding jobs, the news and information business was still losing jobs,' says Shatkin. 'That's why "I'll find something" is not an adequate career plan for 2011. You need to choose a specific goal and develop a smart strategy to take advantage of the opportunities that 2011 does have to offer'." The same article later appeared on the CareerPath.com site.

Joyce Lain Kennedy mentioned the book in her column: "'Find a niche that is not overcrowded and is related to your core skills; then, acquire the specialized skills to excel in that role,' says Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., a veteran in career information publishing and the author of 2011 Career Plan (JIST Publishing; jist.com). 'Your niche may be at the intersection of two very different skills. For example, you may be a police officer who is an inspiring teacher, or a chemist who is an ace computer programmer. In a tight job market, employers are more interested in someone with the perfect fit of skills than in a generalist'."

The blog NWJobs quotes from the book: "While jobs, in general, are still not expected to be plentiful next year or even in 2012, Shatkin says there are some sectors to watch that may have the most promise in terms of job creation. 'This recovery is also a patchwork affair, with some industries bouncing back much faster than others,' he writes. 'For example, in March 2010, while manufacturers were adding jobs, the news and information business was still losing jobs'." 


100 Fastest-Growing Careers


I appeared on CBS's The Early Show to discuss the five top careers from this book. CBS chose not to put the studio interview sequence on their website, but you can see the
"Backstage" interview that we shot immediately afterward for their streaming Web service. CBS also put a related story on their news site.

The MomCorps site mentioned the book and linked to the CBS interview: "We've been hearing so much depressing news about the job market, it's a refreshing change when there's actually something good happening out there for hard-working moms. Recently, career expert Dr. Laurence Shatkin Ph.D. appeared on CBS' The Early Show on Saturday Morning to talk about the five fastest-growing jobs right now. (He knows what he's talking about, having helped research and develop the book, 100 Fastest-Growing Careers.) He highlighted these jobs because of their high rate of growth and plenty of openings."

The AOL Jobs site did a feature about this book and quoted me. "The book also has sample resumes for some of the fastest-growing careers, tips on interviewing and a job-match grid to help choose a career."


Occupational Outlook Handbook


USA Today discussed our exclusive section about green occupations: "If you have an inclination toward science and math, the world needs you in a big way as it continues to move toward green jobs and a green economy."









250 Best-Paying Jobs, Second Edition

The book received a favorable review on the Blogcritics site:"The 250 Best Paying Jobs by Michael Farr and Dr. Laurence Shatkin is an excellent resource for career planning by students, blue collar, and white collar workers. The presentation is easy to read and understand. The cost is modest in comparison to the high value of the information contained in the book."


Heidelburg University's website cited the book in a page that describes careers for public relations majors: "Michael Farr and Laurence Shatkin sum up the role of a PR professional very well—their job is to 'plan and direct public relations programs designed to create and maintain a favorable public image for employer or client; or if engaged in fundraising, plan and direct activities to solicit and maintain funds for special projects and nonprofit organizations' (382). This fits with what I mentioned before, which was that you need to get comfortable talking to others—this is not a job for shy, reserved people."


MSN.com ran a CareerBuilder article about the book: "'The truth is people can have a job they love and make a lot of money doing it,' says Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D. In his new book250 Best-Paying Jobs he encourages people who want a high-wage job to consider their personality type when exploring their options."


Another article from CareerBuilder appeared on the websites of the Marion (IN) Star, the Pacific Daily News (Guam), and the Poughkeepsie Journal: "In salary negotiations, the general rule is that whoever divulges their number first, loses. 'During the interview, you should avoid stating an expected salary because it might be either too high, screening you out of further consideration, or too low, allowing them to offer you less than you really deserve,' says Laurence Shatkin, author of '250 Best-Paying Jobs'."


The MSN CareerBuilder site ran an article about Best-Paying Jobs Based on Career Clusters, using information from this book. "In his book 250 Best-Paying Jobs, Shatkin connects high-paying occupations to 16 career clusters, helping individuals identify which occupations are most likely to pay well in the fields and industries that interest them." The AOL Find a Job site also ran this story.


CareerBuilder also ran an article by JIST's publicist, Selena Dehne, about High-Paying Jobs for Your Personality Type: "'The truth is people can have a job they love and make a lot of money doing it,' says Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D. In his new book, 250 Best-Paying Jobs, he encourages people who want a high-wage job to consider their personality type when exploring their options."


The book also got a mention on empleosCB, a job board for Latinos: "Shatkin connects high-paying occupations to 16 career clusters, helping individuals identify which occupations are most likely to pay well in the fields and industries that interest them." 


 


250 Best Jobs for Renewing America


Jean Chatzky's column in the New York Daily News quoted me about a technique for identifying your skills: "Divide a piece of paper into three columns.In the first, make a list of any worklike activities you've done. Not just paid work, but volunteer positions or work you do at home. I know I want credit for keeping my home organized, our bills paid and birthday parties planned.

In the next column, get specific about the tasks you need to do to accomplish each of these activities. The final column is for the skills you used."


The New York Public Library's blog mentioned this book among several with information about the changing job market.


IEEE-Today's Engineer featured a write-up about what the book had to say about environmental engineers: "In his book, Shatkin cites research from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) which foresaw a 25.4 percent increase in environmental engineering jobs over the ten years from 2006 to 2016. That's not bad at all, but Shatkin says the actual prospects are even better.  'The outlook for environmental engineers has actually improved since I wrote the book,' he says. 'The BLS now projects 30.6% growth between 2008 and 2018.'  This translates to an additional 16,600 environmental engineering jobs expected to be created in the United States during that decade."

The Boston Globe
 cited this book in an article about the top jobs in green technology. "
'I looked at jobs that had to do with energy efficiency, with renewable energy, with saving money through recycling and other practices like that,' he said. 'We can't have a green economy without these people involved.'"

Graduating Engineer & Computer Careers Magazine noted the good news for high-tech workers: "
In his book,...Shatkin forecasts 20% job growth with average annual earnings slightly above $70,000 for environmental and industrial engineers as businesses look for ways to reduce energy and operational costs, particularly in construction industries."
 

The California Job Journal profiled this book: "In order to succeed in the 21st century, we’re working to improve education, expand health care, fix the infrastructure, overhaul our manufacturing industries, adopt green technologies, and continue our leadership in high-tech innovation."

The Yahoo HotJobs site referred to this book in an article about high-paying green jobs and in another article about best jobs for telecommuting: "With so many baby boomers approaching retirement age, Shatkin says that financial planning is a growing field. Certified advisors work for themselves, and thus have the freedom to take as much or as little work as they like. 'This is growing very fast,' says Shatkin. The downside is that meetings tend to take place during the evening, after clients have left work."

Hire Ground, a blog on the NWJobs website maintained by the Seattle Times, posted a feature about green jobs that are highlighted in this book. "In the green technology sector, Shatkin found that many of the new jobs can be found in the construction industry as property owners look for ways to reduce energy and operational costs." 

Boston.com posted a feature on the same subject, but it includes a lot of quotes from an interview with me, such as this one: "'Industrial engineers are efficiency experts, safety experts, and quality control experts,' Shatkin said. They can apply these skills to any process, making it more green, more efficient, and more sustainable in terms of resource use."



200 Best Jobs Through Apprenticeships


I've created 
a YouTube presentation about the major themes of this book. It's a slide show with voice-over narration.

The book was mentioned, and I was heavily quoted, on the Bargaineering site: "Electricians are often thought of in residential repair roles, but '…actually most of them are working in construction of new buildings or retrofitting [older] buildings,' says Laurence Shatkin, author of '250 Best Jobs Through Apprenticeships.' Electrician apprentices learn to read blueprints and technical diagrams, maintain wiring and lighting systems and repair electrical equipment and lighting fixtures he adds."

The AOL Jobs site featured 
an article by Carol Tice about this book: "There are three advantages to participating in an official apprenticeship program, says Laurence Shatkin, co-author of 200 Best Jobs Through Apprenticeships (JIST Publishing, 2009). With a formal program, you'll complete a training course of a required length, and potential employers will know you've demonstrated a specific skill level. The rules of the apprenticeship will protect you from being exploited on the job, as they define the wages you should be paid. And finally, you'll make valuable industry contacts."


Your $100,000 Career Plan


24 Hours Vancouver quoted me: "Employers often ask for your salary expectations or salary 

history very early, perhaps even as part of the job application form or letter. This makes it easy for them to screen out a large number of applicants who don't match the salary figure they have in mind. Don't screen yourself out by giving this information," warns Shatkin.








200 Best Jobs for College Graduates

CNN.com and AOL.com cited the book in a CareerBuilder story: "Shatkin and Farr looked for jobs with a high concentration of workers between 20 and 24 years old. They looked beyond what the starting salaries are and sought careers that have potential for growth and higher salaries in the future." 

The AOL Find a Job site featured a story that references this book: "Fancy yourself the next Don Draper or Peggy Olson from 'Mad Men'? Why not try your hand at writing ad copy? 'Here's something for the English major to be doing now that journalism doesn't seem to be such a prospect,' Shatkin says. Although you might start by contributing text to lower-profile agency projects, in time 'you can be involved to the point where you're developing entire ad campaigns,' Shatkin says.

The Washington Times quotes me 
about prospects for this year's grads: "Some industries like high-tech and health care are still doing very well. Engineering careers tend to fluctuate with the economy, but over the long haul they can be a very good choice." 

CNBC quotes me in an article on the Web: “The health-care industry is very reliable even in bad times, with nursing being the most obvious [area of opportunity]" due to the nationwide shortage of trained nurses."

A blog at the University of Chicago site features an interview with me (recipient of a master's from that distinguished institution): "I would say in general about careers, it helps to have a back-up plan. While you’re still in school, you should have a Plan B in mind. When you applied to a college, you probably had a safety school that you applied to, and you might also have a safety career in mind, and take a few courses so you’ll be ready for that one as well."

 !


Great Jobs in the President's Stimulus Plan


The Triangle Tribune (NC) quoted me: "Computer-security experts who can help keep electronic medical records locked away from computer hackers and other unauthorized users will be in high demand as the health-care sector modernizes."

The BusinessWeek website refers to this book in an article about stimulus jobs: "
Shatkin also points to the development of a smarter electric grid, the computerization of medical records, and the development of a larger broadband network, as initiatives chock full of opportunities for educated workers."

A story on the Monster site (which quotes me) focuses on high-paying jobs in information technology: "Another area targeted by stimulus spending -- extending broadband Internet access to rural areas -- will also generate jobs for network systems and data communication analysts (both earning $68,000) as well as information security specialists ($71,000), Shatkin says."

Roxanne Ravenel interviewed me on her BlogTalk Radio show, The Savvy Jobseeker.

I was interviewed about this book on Weekend All Things Considered: 
"It's one of the ironies of what I do that it does better when times are bad."

The Career Key Blog 
covered the book: "If you’d like to know more about what career options and opportunities the new stimulus package offers, I just came across an excellent, timely book for your career research."


150 Best Recession-Proof Jobs


The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette website featured a Monster article based on the book: "'It's true that older and lower-skilled workers are losing their jobs in manufacturing,' Shatkin says. 'But there are newer, highly skilled jobs in manufacturing that are in great demand now, and require only vocational training and an apprenticeship'."

Good Housekeeping did a story that quoted me and later turned up on MSN Lifestyle.

The Forbes website did a feature about job security that quoted me and referred to this book.

The AOL "Find a Job" site by CareerBuilder featured the book: "For boosted job security, Shatkin suggests looking for work not only in a recession-resistant occupation, but also within a recession-resistant industry."

I get cited on The Real College Guide site: “We need people in liberal arts who understand science and math, and engineers and scientists who can write.” 


The book and a brief interview with me were featured in a story on the CBS Evening News. I was also featured in a story on CNN (see still below). It also got a mention on Amarillo's Channel 10. (See the picture below of the reporter holding up the book.)

I was interviewed about this book on the Fox Business Network
: "A recession-proof job serves some essential function, is something that everybody needs, something without a great deal of fluctuation in demand.” "To recession-proof your job, you can try to get in an industry where there's less sensitivity to economic ups and downs."

I was a guest on NPR's Talk of the Nation to discuss this book and the current problems of job-seekers: "It's unfortunate that a lot of the jobs that people fall back on, like in retail or waiting tables...those jobs are particularly hard-hit right now."
 
The Associated Press featured the book in an article that was syndicated in many cities: "Technology jobs such as computer systems analysts -- who deal with organizing and presenting data such as financial information -- are hard to send overseas because their work is a collaborative process, Shatkin said. Networking can focus on different aspects of technology, such as smart phones or the Internet, but the common thread is a need for people to set up and maintain the networks, along with develop products that use them."

The book also got coverage at the Time.com site. "I'm not a fortune teller, and nobody's job is 100% secure, but I identified these based on information from the U.S. Department of Labor. I developed a pool of 180 occupations that are resistant to economic downturn and then sorted them according to their economic rewards — income, job openings and job growth. These are the best of the recession-proof jobs."
 
 
150 Best Low-Stress Jobs

Larry Buhl referred to the book in a Yahoo! HotJobs article: "There are dozens of low-stress jobs available across a wide variety of fields, according to Laurence Shatkin, career information expert and author of 150 Best Low-Stress Jobs. And the vast majority of those jobs have good growth potential and good wages as well, says Shatkin."  







  

200 Best Jobs for Introverts

This book was endorsed in a blog on the Psychology Today website: "The book includes a wealth of information including descriptions of the jobs, annual earnings, percent growth, and annual openings for each type of job. It also rates each position for its level of solitary work and its level of contact with others." There was also a link to my YouTube video on the subject.


The book was the center of considerable discussion on the website of the ABA Law Journal. It was featured on the CareerBuilder site, with a front-page link at MSN.com. It was profiled in the blog JobsInTheMoney. The California Job Journal mentions it. Here is an excerpt from the extensive interview at the CV Tips website: "If you really are very introverted, then use your strengths when you are making career decisions and career moves, because you have many strengths you can bring to the task: the ability to do in-depth research, weigh many factors thoughtfully, and prepare excellent documentation (resumes and portfolios)." 


 

Salary Facts Handbook

The AskFamilys site ran a story about what the book says regarding pay differences between men and women: "'For most occupations female workers earn less, but this is not always the result of discrimination in the way wages are determined. In some cases the disparity results from choices female employees make about their work arrangements. For example, some women leave the workforce or work part-time hours for a few years while their children are very young. In other cases, comparable male and female workers may be earning similar pay, but in the past male workers have greatly outnumbered female workers. Therefore, female workers are more likely to be relative newcomers who are earning less,' says Laurence Shatkin, Ph.D., a Senior Product Developer at JIST."


 The CNN website ran an article citing this book: "Look for sites that have local salary data and offer specific job descriptions or data on jobs with multiple levels of experience. If you're an accountant, for example, salary ranges should be available for entry- to senior-level positions."


 

 

150 Best Jobs for a Better World

 The MSN Careers Site ran a story about this book. I discuss my criteria for jobs in the book in a Career Jam posting on the NewWork News site. "“Different people have different opinions about which jobs make the world a better place, but typically the jobs should involve a lot of helping people, teaching people, improving people’s health and well-being, protecting people from harm, or enriching people’s lives.”  

 


 





175 Best Jobs Not Behind a Desk

The My San Antonio site ran an article about the book: "The shift to an information-based economy has meant a constant increase in the proportion of workers who manipulate data for a living, and who therefore spend most of the workday behind a desk," Shatkin says. Fortunately, though, there are still plenty of high-activity jobs for people who prefer them, he adds.

I wrote an article for AOL Jobs based on the ideas in this book, with new occupational information: "Most of us no longer earn our salaries by the sweat of our brows. Instead, we work at sedentary jobs, don't work up a sweat on the job (except from stressful situations), and put on the pounds. Fortunately, not all high-paying jobs are sedentary, especially those in health care and education."

CareerBuilder profiled this book in an article that has been posted on the the CNN U.S. site and the MSN Careers site. I also devoted one of my Career Jam postings to this subject. "Fortunately, there are plenty of high-activity jobs for people who prefer them. And these are not just menial jobs that are likely to be phased out as soon as someone invents the right kind of robot to do them," Farr and Shatkin say. "Many active jobs have good earnings and are expected to have good job opportunities. They allow you to use your brains as well as your muscles and involve the kinds of people and problems that can keep you interested in your work." 

 
 
225 Best Jobs for Baby Boomers

The book was referenced on the career services blog of Texas Wesleyan University: "For reasons that vary from being under less financial stress to being able to consider part-time work for the first time, boomers now have the option of making another career move instead of retiring. Farr and Shatkin analyzed data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics to formulate lists of jobs with a high percentage of baby boomers — specifically, the jobs for which 40 percent of the workforce is age 45 or older. The jobs listed had the best combination of high salaries, fast growth and ample job openings."


The Free Library gives the book a favorable write-up. A blogger who styles herself Ms. Meacham: Money Maven also mentions the book. "For reasons that vary from being under less financial stress to being able to consider part-time work for the first time, boomers now have the option of making another career move instead of retiring."

 

  

 

250 Best-Paying Jobs

The Boston.com website featured the book in a Monster article by Dona DeZube: "To create his list of best-paying jobs, Shatkin combined US Department of Labor and Census Bureau data on current median earnings, as well as projections for future annual openings and job growth. Taken together, those figures reveal the best-paying jobs in fields with a reasonable number of openings now and in the future."


College Central ran a feature about this book. California Job Journal features this book in an article called "Lucrative Jobs for Young Careerists": "You thought your first few years in the workforce would be blessed with a salary generous enough to provide you with a flashy new car, a chic apartment and plenty of extra money for a killer wardrobe or a plasma TV. Instead, you dined on Ramen noodles every day, took the bus to work, and barely scraped savings together while living paycheck to paycheck."